The Influence Project Hijackers Surrender

by Nate on August 3, 2010

surrenderFlagThe time has come to step away from playing pirate with the Fast Company Influence Project. The last four days have been fun and interesting, but last night Mark Borden left a response to my initial challenge in the comments of the Hijacking post. He stated that Fast Company is not interested in working with ItStartsWith.Us to move this project in [what we think is] a more meaningful direction. He was a gentleman about it, and I would like to be a gentleman in return, and gracious in defeat. Congratulations, sir, on a game well played. We will now shove off and leave you to your business.

So there you have it, folks. No more Captain Nate and the good ship ISWU. We had a good run and managed to capture the attention of those running the Influence Project, which is no small feat. Congratulations on that, and thank you all so much for your help. I hope you guys had as much fun as I did.

At the end of the day, however, all of these shenanigans can be broken down to a small, simple question: would Fast Company work with someone like me (and us) to try something a little bit different? They said no, and I take full responsibility for that. When I was thinking about the Influence Project last Thursday, I wanted to figure out a way to change the tide of public opinion from mostly negative to mostly positive. I thought that if Fast Company kept everything else the same, but added in the single component of giving everyone in the project a chance to pool their collective influence to do something positive, together, then they could get some good value out of the project and sway the public opinion. I knew that I could help them with this, since this is what I’ve done with a large degree of success over the past year or so, utilizing the micro-giving concept in large groups, but forming it into a meaningful, personal activity for every individual involved.

Usually in cases like this I would go directly to the point person for the project (in this case Mark Borden) and have a chat with them to see if this is something they’d be interested in. But this time I decided to try something a little different. I thought that since there’s already this swirling controversy around the project, and many of the participants are on the brink of mutiny, I could use that existing energy and channel it into a cohesive message, one that gets the point across in an obvious way and attracts attention to the idea at the same time. Hence the whole hijacking concept and pirate theme. I thought that a lot of people would get behind it, quickly understand the possibilities of what we could do, and agree to follow my lead in building a shared service component to this project.

I was wrong.

I went about it the flashy way, the attention-getting way, instead of my normal sincere, one-on-one way. And now I’m left wondering if I made a big mistake and missed a golden opportunity to work with a brand that I really respect to help them improve one of their big projects. I’m sorry for causing even more of a negative stir for a lot of people with this endeavor, and I’d like to apologize to anyone who jumped on board with me and is now embarrassed that they did so. I took a chance, and I failed.

I’ve written about failure before, and I truly believe that failure is okay as long as you learn from it. With that in mind, here are the top few things I learned from this exercise.

1)  Sensationalism attracts attention, but warps perception
I built a cool little campaign around the hijacking theme, but by necessity it had to be over the top, and my role as the pirate captain had to be over the top as well. I found myself forced to be more egocentric and self-righteous than I wanted to be. It did not feel good. An even bigger downside is the fact that now my public perception for a lot of people is as a loud, brash bully. And that is totally not what I’m about, as everyone on the ISWU team can attest. But now I’ve gone and branded myself that way to a lot of people. Dang it.

2)  Context matters – a lot
Mixing messages is confusing for people – and for me. Usually I’m able to talk about what the ItStartsWith.Us team does with great clarity and effectiveness, and people get the concept very quickly. And once they get it, they usually want to be a part of it. It’s really an incredible thing. But I couldn’t get that to work with this project. I was consistently surprised with how difficult it was to get across the point that we are a sincere group, with no ulterior motive, who have been touching people’s lives for a long time. I learned that if you try to convey that message while dressed as a pirate who’s hijacking someone else’s property, it doesn’t go over so well.

3)  When riding a negative wave, prepare for negativity
I did not see this one coming, and I should have. When I talk to people about the ISWU team and what we do, I’m used to seeing people’s hearts. When I speak at a conference, or talk to an executive team, or get interviewed by a reporter, more often than not there are tears in the other person’s eyes. I’ve seen it time and time again – when the impact of this personalized micro-giving concept hits people, and they see how lives can literally be changed, it touches their heart. In this case that didn’t happen. I was fighting negative perception the whole way, and I just wanted to scream out “this is NOT what we’re about!” If you use negative energy to propel you forward, you wear that negativity like a cloak – it goes with you everywhere.

Those are the lessons I took away from this little escapade. I’ll remember them for next time, and hopefully do a little better. But for right now it’s time to pick myself up, dust off and move forward with the mission. We still have to change the world, after all. :)

We’re still moving forward with the final project next Wednesday. Believe that. We will execute with our existing team, as well as anyone from the hijacking team or the general public who wants to be a part of it. We’re going to illustrate the idea that you can combine micro-giving with personalization to make a huge impact with a small effort, and you can create stories out of these actions that last a lifetime.

You are indeed more influential than you think,  and our final project next week will demonstrate that you are powerfully influential in the lives of those people immediately around you, and that you can change their world . . . your world . . . with just 15 minutes of effort.

So if after all this you’d like to learn more about the ItStartsWith.Us concept, please check out what our team does every week, and also take a look at the incredible impact you can have on a life in just 5 minutes a week with our Love Bomb team.

In all sincerity, if you’d like to join our team, you may do so below. No hijacking, no pirates. Just thousands of people who work together in a free, easy, fast, fun and effective way to make a meaningful difference in the lives of those around them. (p.s. This team is still going to execute on the final shared event for the #hijackFC project, so if you want to be a part of it, jump on in. We’re just going to brand it as ItStartsWith.Us)

I’m ready for anything you guys have to say – let me know what you think in the comments below.

And thanks for listening.

 

UPDATE: 8/3/2010, 12:24pm – I just got an email from one of my ItStartsWith.Us advisors, and I think he captured perfectly what I did not. I asked permission to share it with the rest of you.

First, your post today was exceptionally well written Nate – nice work. And while I agree with your comments, I’m not sure you captured what might have been the real and single most important reason it didn’t work out as you had hoped. As it always is, the focus of ISWU was logically on the end target; that person at the end of the line who ultimately receives the love, fame, attention, notoriety or whatever else the good people of ISWU lavishly and generously volunteer. In this case, however, the one suffering was Fast Company, and rather than look to help them with their work we elected to jump on the you’re-not-getting-it-done bandwagon. You know, it’s possible that what didn’t feel right with the project was the concurrent negative message we were sending to Fast Company along with the usual positive aim of our mission. In my thinking, there is a mission for us all in our near future – find a way to help Fast Company and its leadership in our usual positive and productive way. Something to think about anyway.

 

UPDATE: 8/6/2010, 12:53am – After a good conversation with my dad tonight, I realized that this entire situation is best explained by this exchange from the comments on this post. I decided to pull it up here to give it the attention it deserves:

Question from Warwick:

Sorry my friend but, what am I missing here? This is *your* mission of course, but you’ve invited comment here, and it seems to me that you steered your ship so brilliantly, and then turned tail at the first sign of resistance. Of course maybe something went on that hasn’t been made public, but on the face of it, I’m a more than a bit disappointed.

Fast Company, without a doubt, created The Influence Project to be noticed. They’re not doing it for fun, they are doing it for profit. They are performing on the world stage; a publicity stunt. They are a great company that we all respect, doing something clever and fun. They put a challenge on the table for those with the most influence to come and take the stage. You did that brilliantly. The rewards for both Fast Company and for your own project were world-wide recognition and massive exposure. A (harmless and fun) controversy would drive both objectives. Indeed that’s how I learned about you and your mission.

Fast Company seized the opportunity, eagerly publicized your move and made more even headlines out of it for the both of you. They refused to co-operate, totally understandably (we don’t negotiate with Terrorists), and now you’ve just given up and said sorry. All the fantastic impetus that you put in place has disappeared in one move. I’m gutted. Conformity does not change the world. Otherwise change would be un-necessary. You are undoubtedly a really nice guy, and intelligent, creative and bold, but I question whether the “failure” (wrong word anyway) lies where you think it is. Their project is about influence. Influence is power, and power is taken, not given. You aren’t actually going to kill anybody, or *really* take hostages, it was just a fun way to make a huge amount of publicity, and a great time for all concerned. Any bold move will have some dissenters, this is unavoidable.

That said, and my disappointment aside, I commend you for following what you believe to be the right course of action. It’s your project, and your call, and you’ve alerted some more people to change the world, so it can’t be all bad.

 

Response from me:

Excellent points, Warwick, and well stated. And yes, of course more went on behind the scenes than was public – that’s always the case with things like this. But that’s not what made me back down. And in what I’m about to explain, yes, “failure” is indeed the right word.

I failed not in hijacking the Fast Company project. You’re right, they did the “we don’t negotiate with terrorists” thing, and I could’ve played up that angle and gone back-and-forth and continued with the publicity. You mentioned conformity, and I believe that the whole generation of popularity and publicity in this specific way is just another variation of said conformity. It may be the most clever and fun and interesting way, but conformity it is nonetheless.

And here’s why I say that – in fact, it goes right along with what you said above: ” Influence is power, and power is taken, not given.” That is exactly how it works most of the time. That is how this world is both wired to think and trained to think. But it is not the truth. REAL power comes when it is freely given. Power that is taken may influence actions, but power that is given can change hearts. And THAT’S what I want to do – change people’s hearts.

And that’s where I failed.

I forgot for a moment that the reason this group has been so successful is because I’ve been ALLOWED to lead them, and I’ve stayed true to the spirit of the mission every single time – except Monday. Once I realized what I was doing, I put an end to the project and said sorry . . . to Fast Company, yes, but mostly to my own team, for misrepresenting them according to our standards.

So today it’s back to business as usual. Thanks so much for the comment, and I’m glad to have you with us.

Photo Credit: Davi Sommerfeld
  • http://schoonsense.blogspot.com michelle

    i don't think you failed; fast company is thinking like a business, not like people. it's their own fault the project has become what it has become (a popularity contest for the internet – they might as well have tila tequila as their spokesperson). i still believe in what ISWU does, and i think you are an excellent captain for our “little” crew

  • http://schoonsense.blogspot.com michelle

    i don’t think you failed; fast company is thinking like a business, not like people. it’s their own fault the project has become what it has become (a popularity contest for the internet – they might as well have tila tequila as their spokesperson). i still believe in what ISWU does, and i think you are an excellent captain for our “little” crew

  • http://newdaynewlesson.com/ Susie @ Newdaynewlesson

    I think failure if you can consider this a failure is really just a lesson for the future successes we have. Nothing to be upset or ashamed about, just something to learn from as you have done.

    Keep being yourself.

  • http://newdaynewlesson.com/ Susie @ Newdaynewlesson

    I think failure if you can consider this a failure is really just a lesson for the future successes we have. Nothing to be upset or ashamed about, just something to learn from as you have done.

    Keep being yourself.

  • http://jenfongspeaks.com Jennifer Fong

    Personally, I thought it was fun. And it introduced me to you, who I’m happy to know about. Sorry you got hit with a lot of negativity. But I’ll bet you’ll see a lot of good come from it. Keep up the good work!

  • http://jenfongspeaks.com Jennifer Fong

    Personally, I thought it was fun. And it introduced me to you, who I'm happy to know about. Sorry you got hit with a lot of negativity. But I'll bet you'll see a lot of good come from it. Keep up the good work!

  • http://www.mikeintheshell.com DocHobbes

    I really don’t see this as your failure, nor do I think I look bad for participating. You did what people do on line. You had a goal, a concept, and pushed it. I’m kind of disappointed in Fast Company. Running a popularity contest is pointless, helping to do something good for the world never is.

  • http://www.mikeintheshell.com DocHobbes

    I really don't see this as your failure, nor do I think I look bad for participating. You did what people do on line. You had a goal, a concept, and pushed it. I'm kind of disappointed in Fast Company. Running a popularity contest is pointless, helping to do something good for the world never is.

  • http://www.AlexGPR.com AlexanderG

    A worthy attempt. No need to feel bad.

  • http://www.AlexGPR.com AlexanderG

    A worthy attempt. No need to feel bad.

  • http://www.moneypowerwisdom.com/ drmani

    He who tries to please all, pleases none.

    I don’t see what you did as a “failure”. At all.

    It was a nice attempt. It was never going to appeal to everyone. It did, to a certain kind of person.

    Your tribe, Nate, is made of those people. NOT others. Seth Godin keeps saying a tribe NEEDS ‘outsiders’. Stop trying to rope them ALL in – coz then, you don’t have a tribe at all!

    My perception, of course, is conditioned by my participation in your ‘Love Bombs’ and seeing the impact ‘little acts of kindness’ can have on people desperately in need of some love and attention.

    Others, without the benefit of this experience, are more cynical. No surprise there.

    It’s my personal opinion that if you’d gone ahead with the plan, and accomplished the result you were after, many in that group would have seen things differently – but I also have a fair idea why you decided that backing down was a better choice.

    In the end, we try things, we get some right, we learn some lessons, we do better next time.

    I’ll leave you with Mahatma Gandhi’s quote:

    “First, they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you. Then you win.”

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Thank you, Mani. This sums it up perfectly: “In the end, we try things, we get some right, we learn some lessons, we do better next time.”

  • http://www.Guydz.com/moneypowerwisdom/ drmani

    He who tries to please all, pleases none.

    I don't see what you did as a “failure”. At all.

    It was a nice attempt. It was never going to appeal to everyone. It did, to a certain kind of person.

    Your tribe, Nate, is made of those people. NOT others. Seth Godin keeps saying a tribe NEEDS 'outsiders'. Stop trying to rope them ALL in – coz then, you don't have a tribe at all!

    My perception, of course, is conditioned by my participation in your 'Love Bombs' and seeing the impact 'little acts of kindness' can have on people desperately in need of some love and attention.

    Others, without the benefit of this experience, are more cynical. No surprise there.

    It's my personal opinion that if you'd gone ahead with the plan, and accomplished the result you were after, many in that group would have seen things differently – but I also have a fair idea why you decided that backing down was a better choice.

    In the end, we try things, we get some right, we learn some lessons, we do better next time.

    I'll leave you with Mahatma Gandhi's quote:

    “First, they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you. Then you win.”

  • Anonymous

    Frankly who cares what Fast Company we all participated in both the Influence Project and this project of our own free will. Why do they get to say what we do? It is OUR influence – not theirs. If I want to encourage others to do something good, Fast Company is surely not going to stop me. If they don’t want to play nice and be part of it – so be it. I say we continue on.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Oh, we’re going to continue on – no doubt about that. I’m working on project details for next week right now. :)

      We’re just not going to hold it up as a fight against Fast Company.

      • Anonymous

        OK good. Last time I checked I don’t get my marching orders from Fast Company.

  • bethebutterfly

    Frankly who cares what Fast Company we all participated in both the Influence Project and this project of our own free will. Why do they get to say what we do? It is OUR influence – not theirs. If I want to encourage others to do something good, Fast Company is surely not going to stop me. If they don't want to play nice and be part of it – so be it. I say we continue on.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Oh, we're going to continue on – no doubt about that. I'm working on project details for next week right now. :)

    We're just not going to hold it up as a fight against Fast Company.

  • bethebutterfly

    OK good. Last time I checked I don't get my marching orders from Fast Company.

  • kxm

    Nate: One of the qualities that earns my respect is the ability to take responsibility for yourself and learn from your experience. I, for one, appreciate that you shared your insights with us, as it gives me an even better sense of how you think and who you are. How you have handled your “failure” here further confirms for me that this is a project with which I want to be involved and that you, as its leader, are a person of integrity and worthy of our trust. You’ll make mistakes, we all do. To accept that, explain what you were trying to accomplish, and examine why your approach didn’t work out this time is about the best we can ask of you. Thanks for all that you do. ~ kxm

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Aww, thank you so much.

  • kxm

    Nate: One of the qualities that earns my respect is the ability to take responsibility for yourself and learn from your experience. I, for one, appreciate that you shared your insights with us, as it gives me an even better sense of how you think and who you are. How you have handled your “failure” here further confirms for me that this is a project with which I want to be involved and that you, as its leader, are a person of integrity and worthy of our trust. You'll make mistakes, we all do. To accept that, explain what you were trying to accomplish, and examine why your approach didn't work out this time is about the best we can ask of you. Thanks for all that you do. ~ kxm

  • http://www.conversationagent.com ConversationAgent

    These are really good lessons, Nate. Thank you for letting us see the process.

    I hope the community spends some time reflecting upon them, because I’ve found the three points you make valid and applicable in life, not just to this project. Taking the initiative is a good thing. Without these lessons, Hell would continue to be paved with good intentions, as my great grand mother used to say.

    By taking your own advice, you have shown us what leadership looks like. The reason why I supported your initiative is plain to see now. When Danny Brown shared his thoughts about you, I took the time to read your blog, watch your videos, visit with the people who comment at your posts, and feel the power of the community you’ve helped create. It does start with us.

    I was among the many who experienced that power when Fast Company convened all community curators in Denver in August 2000 — 101 of us from most of the US, and some from as far away as Australia. That was an event to behold. It created life-lasting bonds among equals — in heart, mind, and spirit.

    I know each person has more influence than they think, I see it every day. Walking the talk is really hard, especially when economics distract us from expansive thinking. I thank you for thinking expansively with this project. And thanks go to Mark Boden from Fast Company for playing a key role in this conversation.

    We will keep the business discussion for another day, when we can put more perspective on the whole affair. People come first.

    PS: As a European, I’ve learned to balance diplomacy and the rich Asian culture of helping the other “save face” with the pioneering, let’s go do it, American mindset. I still go from zero to Italian in no time :)

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Thank you so much, Valeria – I look forward to connecting soon.

  • http://www.conversationagent.com ConversationAgent

    These are really good lessons, Nate. Thank you for letting us see the process.

    I hope the community spends some time reflecting upon them, because I've found the three points you make valid and applicable in life, not just to this project. Taking the initiative is a good thing. Without these lessons, Hell would continue to be paved with good intentions, as my great grand mother used to say.

    By taking your own advice, you have shown us what leadership looks like. The reason why I supported your initiative is plain to see now. When Danny Brown shared his thoughts about you, I took the time to read your blog, watch your videos, visit with the people who comment at your posts, and feel the power of the community you've helped create. It does start with us.

    I was among the many who experienced that power when Fast Company convened all community curators in Denver in August 2000 — 101 of us from most of the US, and some from as far away as Australia. That was an event to behold. It created life-lasting bonds among equals — in heart, mind, and spirit.

    I know each person has more influence than they think, I see it every day. Walking the talk is really hard, especially when economics distract us from expansive thinking. I thank you for thinking expansively with this project. And thanks go to Mark Boden from Fast Company for playing a key role in this conversation.

    We will keep the business discussion for another day, when we can put more perspective on the whole affair. People come first.

    PS: As a European, I've learned to balance diplomacy and the rich Asian culture of helping the other “save face” with the pioneering, let's go do it, American mindset. I still go from zero to Italian in no time :)

  • http://twitter.com/bitsofkindness jen.

    nate, your intentions were noble, the excitement that you garnered from the existing ISWU community (including myself) and those that the word spread on towards, shows that there IS an interest in the concept that you imagined. what did i see the twitter hits at yesterday? so it did not work out with Fast Company, that is an unfortunate loss but doesn’t mean that the concept doesn’t still work. it just didn’t work for them.

    keep up the good work. stay true to yourself and your message and don’t you dare lose the enthusiasm you brought to this escapade…

    and thanks for keeping this post honest and humble.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Thank you, Jen.

  • http://twitter.com/bitsofkindness jen.

    nate, your intentions were noble, the excitement that you garnered from the existing ISWU community (including myself) and those that the word spread on towards, shows that there IS an interest in the concept that you imagined. what did i see the twitter hits at yesterday? so it did not work out with Fast Company, that is an unfortunate loss but doesn't mean that the concept doesn't still work. it just didn't work for them.

    keep up the good work. stay true to yourself and your message and don't you dare lose the enthusiasm you brought to this escapade…

    and thanks for keeping this post honest and humble.

  • DrewCraven

    I’m not even sure what the plan was (or is?) here for the Influence Project. Should I have signed up specifically for this project, or would I have received instructions as a member (I only joined yesterday)? I’m a little unclear on all of this.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      We’re going to do a big shared project next week. Sign up above if you want to be a part of the ISWU team . . . the ones who will be executing on it.

  • DrewCraven

    I'm not even sure what the plan was (or is?) here for the Influence Project. Should I have signed up specifically for this project, or would I have received instructions as a member (I only joined yesterday)? I'm a little unclear on all of this.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    We're going to do a big shared project next week. Sign up above if you want to be a part of the ISWU team . . . the ones who will be executing on it.

  • http://volunteerstories.wordpress.com/ Michal

    Reading this clarified a lot for me. I just signed up recently, and this was my first non-Love Bomb project. The approach confused me, because – with no idea what the end goal was – it DID sound very negative and abrasive and I became a bit uncomfortable targeting another organization’s project without a clear sense of “this is the objective and why this is going to be positive in the end”. I’m hopeful, after reading this, that I’ll get a better sense of how ISWU works and the positive energy that it’s about in the future.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      I agree, Michal – I was getting that sense myself, which is a big part of why I called it off. I didn’t do it the best way possible. I feel a lot better now. And you’ll be able to see some of the very cool things we do without other stuff attached.

  • http://volunteerstories.wordpress.com/ Michal

    Reading this clarified a lot for me. I just signed up recently, and this was my first non-Love Bomb project. The approach confused me, because – with no idea what the end goal was – it DID sound very negative and abrasive and I became a bit uncomfortable targeting another organization's project without a clear sense of “this is the objective and why this is going to be positive in the end”. I'm hopeful, after reading this, that I'll get a better sense of how ISWU works and the positive energy that it's about in the future.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ty.jones Ty Jones

    Hey Nate,

    Ya got a fan now.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      High praise, Ty. Thank you.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ty.jones Ty Jones

    Hey Nate,

    Ya got a fan now.

  • Heidi Massey

    Hey Nate,
    I really see this as about vision. You are driven by vision. Everything you do is to reach toward that vision. Not everyone can see it…some can. Some trust your vision. Others just believe you are wrong.

    But I am so passionate about the potential to truly create a better world…I think from the first time we connected I sensed that about you too. You are an idealist. Some say that dies as you get older. But I am turning 50 this year and am still a raging idealist. Don’t let this experience chase out that idealism from you. It is what makes you so effective…you truly believe that you can make a difference. Not everyone buys into that…they will miss out. They will be too busy using yesterday’s lens to live by instead of the extraordinary lens of tomorrow that you have provided. It empowers you and in turn all of us. So stay true to it and know that this was much more about others not able to see what is possible than anything else.

    Thank you for all you do!

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Thanks for the kind words, Heidi. I think I get some of the why’s, and experience is helping me figure out some of the how’s.

  • Heidi Massey

    Hey Nate,
    I really see this as about vision. You are driven by vision. Everything you do is to reach toward that vision. Not everyone can see it…some can. Some trust your vision. Others just believe you are wrong.

    But I am so passionate about the potential to truly create a better world…I think from the first time we connected I sensed that about you too. You are an idealist. Some say that dies as you get older. But I am turning 50 this year and am still a raging idealist. Don't let this experience chase out that idealism from you. It is what makes you so effective…you truly believe that you can make a difference. Not everyone buys into that…they will miss out. They will be too busy using yesterday's lens to live by instead of the extraordinary lens of tomorrow that you have provided. It empowers you and in turn all of us. So stay true to it and know that this was much more about others not able to see what is possible than anything else.

    Thank you for all you do!

  • http://twitter.com/DeniseWBarreto Denise W Barreto

    Well written post, Nate. Love the authenticity of this site and your energy.

    SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO glad I jumped on when I saw people in my network spreading this yesterday because now I can be part of your tribe.

    I am still going to be a pirate – but a friendly one :)

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      That’s exactly what I want to hear, Denise – good stuff.

  • http://twitter.com/DeniseWBarreto Denise W Barreto

    Well written post, Nate. Love the authenticity of this site and your energy.

    SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO glad I jumped on when I saw people in my network spreading this yesterday because now I can be part of your tribe.

    I am still going to be a pirate – but a friendly one :)

  • http://www.beingfullypresent.com Elbiddulph

    I blogged today about why I joined the hijack (www.beingfullypresent.com). Tomorrow’s post will be a reflection on the “surrender.” I guess what comes to mind is the old saying credited to Thomas Edison, I believe…”I have not failed. I discovered 10,000 ways that won’t work.” OK, make that 10,001.

    I, for one, am thankful for the event, as otherwise I may not have found your organization. Looking forward to sharing in effort for good.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Looking forward to having you along for the ride. :)

  • http://www.beingfullypresent.com Elbiddulph

    I blogged today about why I joined the hijack (http://www.beingfullypresent.com). Tomorrow's post will be a reflection on the “surrender.” I guess what comes to mind is the old saying credited to Thomas Edison, I believe…”I have not failed. I discovered 10,000 ways that won't work.” OK, make that 10,001.

    I, for one, am thankful for the event, as otherwise I may not have found your organization. Looking forward to sharing in effort for good.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    I agree, Michal – I was getting that sense myself, which is a big part of why I called it off. I didn't do it the best way possible. I feel a lot better now. And you'll be able to see some of the very cool things we do without other stuff attached.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Looking forward to having you along for the ride. :)

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    That's exactly what I want to hear, Denise – good stuff.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Thanks for the kind words, Heidi. I think I get some of the why's, and experience is helping me figure out some of the how's.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    High praise, Ty. Thank you.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Thank you, Jen.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Thank you so much, Valeria – I look forward to connecting soon.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Aww, thank you so much.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Thank you, Mani. This sums it up perfectly: “In the end, we try things, we get some right, we learn some lessons, we do better next time.”

  • http://nonprofity.com Claire

    The best and most memorable lessons always have an element of fail — my favourite stories to tell usually start with: “Uh, this one time, I thought it would go this way, but it really went…”

    Fast Company is on target to do what they need to do, for good or bad, they’ve always been clear that they’re looking to find the person who can get the most clicks on the web. Their experiment doesn’t need help – it is what it is. There are other projects (Pepsi refresh etc) that are popularity contests for social good.

    You’re on target to continue to do what your community is best at, mobilization with positivity. Setting clear objectives & targets sounds more like your group than being mysterious. Rather than alienate a potential ally, you might have set the stage for projects in common in the future.

    This honest and thoughtful post from you would certainly make me consider the possibilities down the road if I were Fast Company.

  • http://nonprofity.com Claire

    The best and most memorable lessons always have an element of fail — my favourite stories to tell usually start with: “Uh, this one time, I thought it would go this way, but it really went…”

    Fast Company is on target to do what they need to do, for good or bad, they've always been clear that they're looking to find the person who can get the most clicks on the web. Their experiment doesn't need help – it is what it is. There are other projects (Pepsi refresh etc) that are popularity contests for social good.

    You're on target to continue to do what your community is best at, mobilization with positivity. Setting clear objectives & targets sounds more like your group than being mysterious. Rather than alienate a potential ally, you might have set the stage for projects in common in the future.

    This honest and thoughtful post from you would certainly make me consider the possibilities down the road if I were Fast Company.

  • http://joshuaopinion.com Josh Opinion

    Not a failure by any means Nate… not even close.

    You’ve always had vision and have dedicated your life to this, ItStartsWithUs knows that.

    In terms of Fast Company, regardless of the opinion around it you saw an opportunity to leverage a space… a HUGE space… that would allow people the opportunity to step outside of themselves and do good for another.

    That space was missed by the majority, I am sure others wondered what the Influence Project was really about at the end of the day. You were the one who decided to stick his neck out and say this is more about ourselves and our networks… this was a time to really collaborate and make a collective difference.

    Failure? No.

    It takes a big person to do this type of thing. BUT it takes a bigger person to recognize when something isn’t congruent with your authentic self and make that admission publicly.

    You’re leading by example showing others what ItStartsWith.Us is all about- never about the self, always about how we can make a change to others.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Wow, man – thanks.

  • http://joshuaopinion.com Josh Opinion

    Not a failure by any means Nate… not even close.

    You've always had vision and have dedicated your life to this, ItStartsWithUs knows that.

    In terms of Fast Company, regardless of the opinion around it you saw an opportunity to leverage a space… a HUGE space… that would allow people the opportunity to step outside of themselves and do good for another.

    That space was missed by the majority, I am sure others wondered what the Influence Project was really about at the end of the day. You were the one who decided to stick his neck out and say this is more about ourselves and our networks… this was a time to really collaborate and make a collective difference.

    Failure? No.

    It takes a big person to do this type of thing. BUT it takes a bigger person to recognize when something isn't congruent with your authentic self and make that admission publicly.

    You're leading by example showing others what ItStartsWith.Us is all about- never about the self, always about how we can make a change to others.

  • http://www.justfun54.blogspot.com/ Dileepal

    Nate!

    I am here because of my IDOL – Dr Mani.

    For two years I’ve been without a job having resigned deliberately looking close at the way things happen (on the www) & what individuals do on the WWW – too.

    I left my job after 32 years – having six more years to go – in search of something regard to what people actaully do to earn a living.

    This will clarify:
    htt://www.justfun54.blogspot.com/

    Now – Yes! now – I have found my Niche.

    “”Delivering Value”"

    I intend doing this by way of training – initially free for two months.

    I want to be the leading person to go to when it comes to, Training on Self Excellnce leading to Value Delivery with a trusting relationship yielding Productivity & Profits.

    That should suffice.

    Glad to be here.

    dileepa.
    twitter – justfun54

  • http://www.justfun54.blogspot.com/ Dileepal

    Nate!

    I am here because of my IDOL – Dr Mani.

    For two years I've been without a job having resigned deliberately looking close at the way things happen (on the www) & what individuals do on the WWW – too.

    I left my job after 32 years – having six more years to go – in search of something regard to what people actaully do to earn a living.

    This will clarify:
    htt://www.justfun54.blogspot.com/

    Now – Yes! now – I have found my Niche.

    “”Delivering Value”"

    I intend doing this by way of training – initially free for two months.

    I want to be the leading person to go to when it comes to, Training on Self Excellnce leading to Value Delivery with a trusting relationship yielding Productivity & Profits.

    That should suffice.

    Glad to be here.

    dileepa.
    twitter – justfun54

  • Peliroo

    Agree with Josh (and well put!) Big picture. New members, more awareness. This is forward motion. Think of the exponential growth. VERY impressed with everyone in this group! (Will use more subjects and verbs later. Promise!)

  • Peliroo

    Agree with Josh (and well put!) Big picture. New members, more awareness. This is forward motion. Think of the exponential growth. VERY impressed with everyone in this group! (Will use more subjects and verbs later. Promise!)

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      hahaha @ subjects and verbs

  • Charlotte

    I believe that we keep moving forward and staying positive, I am knowing that this only makes us stronger in having faith in each other to stand strong and keep making a POSITIVE difference in others and ourselves. I appreciate your honest reactions and your willingness to say it didn’t work so well and as we all well know…….we can lead a horse to water……..but we cannot make him drink!! So, in my opinion, ALL IS GOOD!!!

  • Charlotte

    I believe that we keep moving forward and staying positive, I am knowing that this only makes us stronger in having faith in each other to stand strong and keep making a POSITIVE difference in others and ourselves. I appreciate your honest reactions and your willingness to say it didn't work so well and as we all well know…….we can lead a horse to water……..but we cannot make him drink!! So, in my opinion, ALL IS GOOD!!!

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Wow, man – thanks.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    hahaha @ subjects and verbs

  • http://www.bcausemedia.com Noland Hoshino

    It takes a great man to want to change the world.It takes a GREATER man to look inside HIMSELF.Holy cow Nate! I have greater respect for you now (if that’s possible) than ever before. I agree with a lot of your friends that your attempt to pirate FastCompany wasn’t a failure. If no one felt compelled to do something good, we would live in a status quo world. Your passion to want to change the world for good and drive to get things done lead you down this road. That’s just who you are — a fireball of compassion and energy. You shouldn’t apologize for being YOU. In fact, we need more people in this world like YOU.Your latest post just gave us (your friends) an insight about the fire that burns within you, and we stand next to you to keep warm during dark times. It Starts With Us would have never been born if it wasn’t for the light you hold. You are a great and noble man, sir.Keep up with the great work and continue to be a beacon of GOOD.Thank you for sharing yourself and ItStartsWithUs.Noland

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      *humbled and touched* Thank you.

  • http://www.bcausemedia.com Noland Hoshino

    It takes a great man to want to change the world.
    It takes a GREATER man to look inside HIMSELF.

    Holy cow Nate! I have greater respect for you now (if that's possible) than ever before.

    I agree with a lot of your friends that your attempt to pirate FastCompany wasn't a failure. If no one felt compelled to do something good, we would live in a status quo world. Your passion to want to change the world for good and drive to get things done lead you down this road. That's just who you are — a fireball of compassion and energy. You shouldn't apologize for being YOU. In fact, we need more people in this world like YOU.

    Your latest post just gave us (your friends) an insight about the fire that burns within you, and we stand next to you to keep warm during dark times. It Starts With Us would have never been born if it wasn't for the light you hold. You are a great and noble man, sir.

    Keep up with the great work and continue to be a beacon of GOOD.

    Thank you for sharing yourself and ItStartsWithUs.

    Noland

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    *humbled and touched* Thank you.

  • http://twitter.com/conversionation J-P De Clerck

    It’s not failure, Nate. When I jumped on June 30th for Mashable’s so-called Social Media Day we had a great event to “celebrate social media”. But what I (we) really did was connect with Mashable and ask for some attention for the Facebook campaign of World without Torture (even if it was just a button or mentioning it). I wrote several mails to Mashable’s project and community manager. Each one regarding the event itself was answered; but never those about the cause we supported. After a while, I stopped asking. 237 people attended the event to party. Mashable did one thing: send a video of Pete Cashmore saying hi to the “worldwide Mashable Social Media” day. The event was organized in ten days (I’ll spare you the details). We hadn’t changed the world. And I was forced to show the Pete Cashmore video by some sponsors because “he is so cute”. So we felt beaten and we moved on, to Fast Company where we will be beaten again. Yesterday I decided to take a break from it all and even stop my blog on social media etc.

    I know I’m not the most liked person here but I’ll tell you one thing: you cannot fail if you try. It’s the road that matters, not the destination. Only people that don’t try can fail. The only difference is that if you try and don’t succeed, it is seen as failure. Remember that forever.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Thanks for the thoughtful words, J-P. I will remember.

  • http://twitter.com/conversionation J-P De Clerck

    It's not failure, Nate. When I jumped on June 30th for Mashable's so-called Social Media Day we had a great event to “celebrate social media”. But what I (we) really did was connect with Mashable and ask for some attention for the Facebook campaign of World without Torture (even if it was just a button or mentioning it). I wrote several mails to Mashable's project and community manager. Each one regarding the event itself was answered; but never those about the cause we supported. After a while, I stopped asking. 237 people attended the event to party. Mashable did one thing: send a video of Pete Cashmore saying hi to the “worldwide Mashable Social Media” day. The event was organized in ten days (I'll spare you the details). We hadn't changed the world. And I was forced to show the Pete Cashmore video by some sponsors because “he is so cute”. So we felt beaten and we moved on, to Fast Company where we will be beaten again. Yesterday I decided to take a break from it all and even stop my blog on social media etc.

    I know I'm not the most liked person here but I'll tell you one thing: you cannot fail if you try. It's the road that matters, not the destination. Only people that don't try can fail. The only difference is that if you try and don't succeed, it is seen as failure. Remember that forever.

  • http://www.twitter.com/barryfurby @barryfurby

    Hi Nate,

    I shared your excitement at the early stage of this project, and understand the reason it went ahead to start with.

    However, the decision to change direction is completely understood, and respected through and through, and should not be seen as failure. In fact to have been able to succinctly been able top talk us through the reasons in this decision making progress has bought even more value – thank you and well done :)

    @barryfurby

  • http://www.twitter.com/barryfurby @barryfurby

    Hi Nate,

    I shared your excitement at the early stage of this project, and understand the reason it went ahead to start with.

    However, the decision to change direction is completely understood, and respected through and through, and should not be seen as failure. In fact to have been able to succinctly been able top talk us through the reasons in this decision making progress has bought even more value – thank you and well done :)

    @barryfurby

  • Mark Riffey

    What you do every day – being you – is what makes this project what it is. If nothing else, it’s a lesson on the value of that vs trying to be too clever. Failure? Not really. Just a reminder to use the assets you have – your reputation, yourself, your way of making things happen.

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Wise words, Mark. Thank you.

  • Mark Riffey

    What you do every day – being you – is what makes this project what it is. If nothing else, it's a lesson on the value of that vs trying to be too clever. Failure? Not really. Just a reminder to use the assets you have – your reputation, yourself, your way of making things happen.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Thanks for the thoughtful words, J-P. I will remember.

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Wise words, Mark. Thank you.

  • Chelsea

    Apology Accepted.

  • Chelsea

    Apology Accepted.

  • Warwick

    Hi Nate

    Sorry my friend but, what am I missing here? This is *your* mission of course, but you’ve invited comment here, and it seems to me that you steered your ship so brilliantly, and then turned tail at the first sign of resistance. Of course maybe something went on that hasn’t been made public, but on the face of it, I’m a more than a bit disappointed.

    Fast Company, without a doubt, created The Influence Project to be noticed. They’re not doing it for fun, they are doing it for profit. They are performing on the world stage; a publicity stunt. They are a great company that we all respect, doing something clever and fun. They put a challenge on the table for those with the most influence to come and take the stage. You did that brilliantly. The rewards for both Fast Company and for your own project were world-wide recognition and massive exposure. A (harmless and fun) controversy would drive both objectives. Indeed that’s how I learned about you and your mission.

    Fast Company seized the opportunity, eagerly publicized your move and made more even headlines out of it for the both of you. They refused to co-operate, totally understandably (we don’t negotiate with Terrorists), and now you’ve just given up and said sorry. All the fantastic impetus that you put in place has disappeared in one move. I’m gutted. Conformity does not change the world. Otherwise change would be un-necessary. You are undoubtedly a really nice guy, and intelligent, creative and bold, but I question whether the “failure” (wrong word anyway) lies where you think it is. Their project is about influence. Influence is power, and power is taken, not given. You aren’t actually going to kill anybody, or *really* take hostages, it was just a fun way to make a huge amount of publicity, and a great time for all concerned. Any bold move will have some dissenters, this is unavoidable.

    That said, and my disappointment aside, I commend you for following what you believe to be the right course of action. It’s your project, and your call, and you’ve alerted some more people to change the world, so it can’t be all bad.

    Cheers
    Warwick

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      Excellent points, Warwick, and well stated. And yes, of course more went on behind the scenes than was public – that’s always the case with things like this. But that’s not what made me back down. And in what I’m about to explain, yes, “failure” is indeed the right word.

      I failed not in hijacking the Fast Company project. You’re right, they did the “we don’t negotiate with terrorists” thing, and I could’ve played up that angle and gone back-and-forth and continued with the publicity. You mentioned conformity, and I believe that the whole generation of popularity and publicity in this specific way is just another variation of said conformity. It may be the most clever and fun and interesting way, but conformity it is nonetheless.

      And here’s why I say that – in fact, it goes right along with what you said above: ” Influence is power, and power is taken, not given.” That is exactly how it works most of the time. That is how this world is both wired to think and trained to think. But it is not the truth. REAL power comes when it is freely given. Power that is taken may influence actions, but power that is given can change hearts. And THAT’S what I want to do – change people’s hearts.

      And that’s where I failed.

      I forgot for a moment that the reason this group has been so successful is because I’ve been ALLOWED to lead them, and I’ve stayed true to the spirit of the mission every single time – except Monday. Once I realized what I was doing, I put an end to the project and said sorry . . . to Fast Company, yes, but mostly to my own team, for misrepresenting them according to our standards.

      So today it’s back to business as usual. Thanks so much for the comment, and I’m glad to have you with us.

      • Warwick

        Hi Nate

        Thanks for taking the time to give me a greater understanding. I feel our objectives might be very similar in a lot of ways. I have a project coming out of stealth mode in a few weeks, and I feel I might be able to help ISWU. I’ll get in touch closer to the time. Thanks again.

        Cheers
        Warwick

        • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

          Cool – I look forward to hearing from you.

  • Warwick

    Hi Nate

    Sorry my friend but, what am I missing here? This is *your* mission of course, but you've invited comment here, and it seems to me that you steered your ship so brilliantly, and then turned tail at the first sign of resistance. Of course maybe something went on that hasn't been made public, but on the face of it, I'm a more than a bit disappointed.

    Fast Company, without a doubt, created The Influence Project to be noticed. They're not doing it for fun, they are doing it for profit. They are performing on the world stage; a publicity stunt. They are a great company that we all respect, doing something clever and fun. They put a challenge on the table for those with the most influence to come and take the stage. You did that brilliantly. The rewards for both Fast Company and for your own project were world-wide recognition and massive exposure. A (harmless and fun) controversy would drive both objectives. Indeed that's how I learned about you and your mission.

    Fast Company seized the opportunity, eagerly publicized your move and made more even headlines out of it for the both of you. They refused to co-operate, totally understandably (we don't negotiate with Terrorists), and now you've just given up and said sorry. All the fantastic impetus that you put in place has disappeared in one move. I'm gutted. Conformity does not change the world. Otherwise change would be un-necessary. You are undoubtedly a really nice guy, and intelligent, creative and bold, but I question whether the “failure” (wrong word anyway) lies where you think it is. Their project is about influence. Influence is power, and power is taken, not given. You aren't actually going to kill anybody, or *really* take hostages, it was just a fun way to make a huge amount of publicity, and a great time for all concerned. Any bold move will have some dissenters, this is unavoidable.

    That said, and my disappointment aside, I commend you for following what you believe to be the right course of action. It's your project, and your call, and you've alerted some more people to change the world, so it can't be all bad.

    Cheers
    Warwick

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Excellent points, Warwick, and well stated. And yes, of course more went on behind the scenes than was public – that's always the case with things like this. But that's not what made me back down. And in what I'm about to explain, yes, “failure” is indeed the right word.

    I failed not in hijacking the Fast Company project. You're right, they did the “we don't negotiate with terrorists” thing, and I could've played up that angle and gone back-and-forth and continued with the publicity. You mentioned conformity, and I believe that the whole generation of popularity and publicity in this specific way is just another variation of said conformity. It may be the most clever and fun and interesting way, but conformity it is nonetheless.

    And here's why I say that – in fact, it goes right along with what you said above: ” Influence is power, and power is taken, not given.” That is exactly how it works most of the time. That is how this world is both wired to think and trained to think. But it is not the truth. REAL power comes when it is freely given. Power that is taken may influence actions, but power that is given can change hearts. And THAT'S what I want to do – change people's hearts.

    And that's where I failed.

    I forgot for a moment that the reason this group has been so successful is because I've been ALLOWED to lead them, and I've stayed true to the spirit of the mission every single time – except Monday. Once I realized what I was doing, I put an end to the project and said sorry . . . to Fast Company, yes, but mostly to my own team, for misrepresenting them according to our standards.

    So today it's back to business as usual. Thanks so much for the comment, and I'm glad to have you with us.

  • Warwick

    Hi Nate

    Thanks for taking the time to give me a greater understanding. I feel our objectives might be very similar in a lot of ways. I have a project coming out of stealth mode in a few weeks, and I feel I might be able to help ISWU. I'll get in touch closer to the time. Thanks again.

    Cheers
    Warwick

  • MareBear

    Nate – Well, I’m going to come at a totally weird angle on this, but here goes!

    I am a “quiet participant” of ISWU. As I’m sure many, many people are. I absolutely love the weekly missions and Love Bombs. However, when the notice came through about this project, I have to admit that I ignored your email. Yep…ignored it. You see, my mom has Stage 4 breast cancer. Recently, we found out that the cancer has spread to her brain. We will be celebrating her 50th birthday in a month.

    My point to telling you about my mom is that I ignored your email because I was busy dealing with MY life “issues”…not paying much attention to what was going on in the world around me until I got your email today. I don’t know anything about Fast Company…I don’t know anything about you “hijacking” anyone or anything. All I know is that you have gained MORE respect from me (though I didn’t think that was possible) by laying it all out there for us…your team. You apologized for something that you felt did US wrong. Ok…I’m getting to the point…hang in there with me. ;-)

    So…not knowing anything about this “project”…you still managed to touch my heart. YOU…one person…made me really think about humbling myself and reaching out to people or situations that I’ve been unfair or wrong about. My sweet mom always told me to be the bigger person. You, my friend, are one of the biggest people I’ve ever had the pleasure of knowing. (Even though I don’t technically KNOW you in person.) Normally, I don’t comment on the blog, on the boards, or anything else. But I really wanted you to know that you’ve touched my heart today. And isn’t that what the bottom line of ISWU is all about? Touching just one person’s heart?

    Kudos to you Nate!

    Keep doing what you’re doing. Don’t take one single day for granted. This will be a blip on the radar. I will always admire you for humbling yourself to us like that. You are amazing! Think of this as a single solitary Love Bomb from me. :-)

    Hugs and Love comin’ your way!
    ~MareBear~

    • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

      MareBear, this message touched my heart more than anything else I’ve read today. Thank you so much for reaching out to me like that. Today’s been a hard day, and this helps. A lot. :)

      Much love to you and your mom.

    • Heidi Massey

      WOW! What an incredible comment! This is the why of it all…

  • MareBear

    Nate – Well, I'm going to come at a totally weird angle on this, but here goes!

    I am a “quiet participant” of ISWU. As I'm sure many, many people are. I absolutely love the weekly missions and Love Bombs. However, when the notice came through about this project, I have to admit that I ignored your email. Yep…ignored it. You see, my mom has Stage 4 breast cancer. Recently, we found out that the cancer has spread to her brain. We will be celebrating her 50th birthday in a month.

    My point to telling you about my mom is that I ignored your email because I was busy dealing with MY life “issues”…not paying much attention to what was going on in the world around me until I got your email today. I don't know anything about Fast Company…I don't know anything about you “hijacking” anyone or anything. All I know is that you have gained MORE respect from me (though I didn't think that was possible) by laying it all out there for us…your team. You apologized for something that you felt did US wrong. Ok…I'm getting to the point…hang in there with me. ;-)

    So…not knowing anything about this “project”…you still managed to touch my heart. YOU…one person…made me really think about humbling myself and reaching out to people or situations that I've been unfair or wrong about. My sweet mom always told me to be the bigger person. You, my friend, are one of the biggest people I've ever had the pleasure of knowing. (Even though I don't technically KNOW you in person.) Normally, I don't comment on the blog, on the boards, or anything else. But I really wanted you to know that you've touched my heart today. And isn't that what the bottom line of ISWU is all about? Touching just one person's heart?

    Kudos to you Nate!

    Keep doing what you're doing. Don't take one single day for granted. This will be a blip on the radar. I will always admire you for humbling yourself to us like that. You are amazing! Think of this as a single solitary Love Bomb from me. :-)

    Hugs and Love comin' your way!
    ~MareBear~

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    MareBear, this message touched my heart more than anything else I've read today. Thank you so much for reaching out to me like that. Today's been a hard day, and this helps. A lot. :)

    Much love to you and your mom.

  • Heidi Massey

    WOW! What an incredible comment! This is the why of it all…

  • http://ItStartsWith.Us Nate St. Pierre

    Cool – I look forward to hearing from you.

  • http://whatidontknow.net/blog KD Ironside

    Hi Nate, I just found this site and joined your cause. I signed up for the Influence Project. As a newbie to blogging, I wanted to get my name and face out there and see if it would make a difference. It has helped me drive a little bit of traffic. That’s all I hoped to get out of it. Unfortunately, I have to keep checking back because over the weekend, my personal bio disappeared (everyone’s did!) and when they reappeared, mine was wrong. I ended up with somebody else’s funky text. Fixed now… whew!

    I don’t know what you intended to do with the highjack, but I’m sure your intentions were good. Good for you for making the effort to try and do something positive. I understand Fast Company’s viewpoint and you have to respect that. Choosing your battles wisely is critical.You did the right thing. All the best, KD.

  • http://whatidontknow.net/blog KD Ironside

    Hi Nate, I just found this site and joined your cause. I signed up for the Influence Project. As a newbie to blogging, I wanted to get my name and face out there and see if it would make a difference. It has helped me drive a little bit of traffic. That's all I hoped to get out of it. Unfortunately, I have to keep checking back because over the weekend, my personal bio disappeared (everyone's did!) and when they reappeared, mine was wrong. I ended up with somebody else's funky text. Fixed now… whew!

    I don't know what you intended to do with the highjack, but I'm sure your intentions were good. Good for you for making the effort to try and do something positive. I understand Fast Company's viewpoint and you have to respect that. Choosing your battles wisely is critical.You did the right thing. All the best, KD.

  • Eryk

    What a lot of energy and words spent on absolutely NOTHING!! What egos!!

  • Eryk

    What a lot of energy and words spent on absolutely NOTHING!! What egos!!

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